Wonky Stars and a little about me

final_starsI was informed by the store that since I’m not as well known as Oprah, I should, perhaps, introduce myself and explain why I am telling you about my bright, save-me-from-winter-grey quilt, from Michigan. My name is Karen (maybe you got that from the first post) Hanson. AKA Mrs. Hanson when I am being particularly ornery. I am the owner of Quilt Expressions (in Boise, Idaho) but I have been living in Michigan since the end of August. My high-school age son is playing on a hockey team here and I got tired of having someone else knowing my kid better than me. So here I am, learning new skills, like how to run a snow-blower!

So, all that said, let’s get back to the important things–quilting! Today I made a few more houses, sewed more black and white squares together, and started on some wonky stars. Right now I’m just in the “parts and pieces” stage, so if you’re sewing along with me just keep making lots of parts. The more parts you have, the more fun you’ll have putting it all together.

If you’ve never made a wonky star before, here’s how to make a 6″ finished star:

The star background consists of eight, 2 ½” squares of the same fabric (four corner blocks and four star backgrounds).

Star points and one center 2 ½” square should contrast with the background (i.e., if the background is dark, the star center and points will be light, if the background is light, the star center and points will be dark).

Lay out background fabric in a nine-patch formation with eight,
2 ½” squares, and the contrasting center square. Four of the background squares will become the star points. On each of the four background squares, place a (approximately) 2″ x 3″ piece of contrasting fabric across the background square at an angle with right sides together.

star_step1Sew ¼” seam along edge of star point fabric. I drew a line for you to see where to sew.

Fold star point fabric over background and press.

From the back, use the original 2 ½” square as a guide, and trim up the unit to a 2 ½” square. Then from the front, trim off the underneath fabric (the original square) to reduce the bulk. A rotating mat is really helpful about now!

trimmed

 

 

 

Place another 2″ x 3″ piece across the 2 ½” square – the star point fabric should overlap the star point that you previously finished. Sew ¼” seam along the edge.

second-point

Fold, press and trim as before. Repeat the process to make four star-point squares. Pictures below show the pressed, but untrimmed star points; trimming from the back; and the trimmed star points from the front.

trimmed-star-points

Don’t worry if you cut off a point–or two–and make the stars points different colors and angles. Layout the star in a 9-patch as shown below, and sew rows together. Press the top and bottom row seams toward the outer squares; press the center row seams to the middle.Sew rows together to make a wonky star. Blocks should measure 6 ½” square. Make lots of stars–try different backgrounds–think stripes for example! You can make them larger or smaller–just vary the size of the background and center squares.

star_layoutTomorrow I’m going to put up my design wall, and make some more “parts”. I’ll be able to put my pieces up on the wall and start thinking about how I will arrange them. What are you going to do? What ever it is, have a great day.

Karen

 

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4 responses to “Wonky Stars and a little about me

  1. Took a break of a rather tedious quilting project today and made my first wonky house. I was surprised by how difficult it was to let myself not have everything straight or even. Once I let go, though, it was fun! Looking forward to using more of my scraps on a wonky star or two!

  2. Awesome instructions!!! These blocks go together perfect!!! THANKS FOR A GREAT TUTORIAL.

  3. I made a quilt a couple of years ago using the wonky stars and other wonky blocks. It was the most fun I have ever had stitching up different unstructured blocks without using any patterns. If you ever get the chance to do a quilt like this I highly recommend it, it certainly relieved my stress level. I’m looking forward to starting another one again. It’s also a great way to use up those scraps you are accumulating.

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